Eerie photos show how the U.S. is turning into a ghost town

Eerie photos show how the U.S. is turning into a ghost town

No matter where you live in the world right now, the outbreak of the COVID-19 virus originating in China in late 2019 has been all anyone can talk about. It didn’t stay there long, though, spreading like wildfire to nearly every corner of the Earth – even the United States. Now, in the age of shelter in-place and social isolation, the vast landscape of America has changed, as these dramatic photos taken from sea to shining sea show.

The Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool – Washington, D.C.

Washington, D.C. is dotted with numerous reflecting pools throughout the city, and the Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool is one of these many tributes in the nation’s capital. The reflecting pool is situated directly below the Washington Monument, and normally this tourist attraction draws over 24 million visitors from across the globe every year.

The Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool – Washington, D.C.

Today, though, just one jogger dares run past it. Perhaps when the National Mall eventually opens again, it may see its numbers rise once more. For now, it remains quiet and all but abandoned.

Pike Place Market – Seattle, WA

The state of Washington may be considered ground zero for COVID-19 in the U.S., as the first confirmed case was located there. The area of Seattle was also the first in the country to tackle the pandemic with strict confinement measures. This photo show’s the city’s iconic Pike Place Market, one of the oldest continuously operating farmers’ markets in the U.S.

Pike Place Market – Seattle, WA

Usually, the market’s hustle and bustle can be heard from a long way off, as it’s packed with both locals and tourists. Today, however, the market is nearly deserted, as few are willing to risk themselves, even for fresh food.

Times Square – New York, NY

Of all the many, many landmarks the U.S. has to offer, few are as widely recognizable even by people who have never visited the country like Times Square is. Located in Midtown Manhattan, at the very heart of the City That Never Sleeps, Times Square is one of the Big Apple’s busiest areas.

Times Square – New York, NY

Now, with spring already in the air – a time usually marked with thousands upon thousands of people descending on the city – the area stands curiously empty. With its stores shuttered and closed, there is little for the few brave souls visiting New York City to do there at the moment.

The Strip – Las Vegas, NV

We don’t think we’ve ever seen Las Vegas’ legendary Strip looking quite like this before. Just a little over four miles of hotels, casino, and any earthly delight imaginable, the Strips is where “what happens in Vegas, stays in Vegas.”

The Strip – Las Vegas, NV

By the looks of this recent photo, however, not too many things are happening in Sin City at the moment. It seems like the Strip could withstand everything – except COVID-19. With next to no pedestrian traffic and hardly any cars on the road, this photo doesn’t just look unusual – it looks downright post-apocalyptic.

Fisherman’s Wharf – San Francisco, CA

One of the most popular attractions in San Francisco, Fisherman’s Wharf holds countless sights, stores, and eateries. With views of both Golden Gate Bridge and Alcatraz Island, visitors could easily spend an entire day there, just looking at the sea lions and breathing in the fresh salt air of the bay.

Fisherman’s Wharf – San Francisco, CA

This aerial photo, taken by a drone, shows just how much life has changed in the U.S. since the pandemic began. Despite the beautiful weather, closed storefronts and no visitors are the new normal for the Wharf.

Miami Beach – Miami, FL

No, this wasn’t taken at some pristine, secluded beach in Hawaii or some other tropical island. This photo was, believe it or not, taken at Miami Beach, in March. Yes, this is what the unofficial spring break capital of the United States looks like right now.

Miami Beach – Miami, FL

“Spring break is over,” Miami Beach’s mayor said in a recent interview. “The party is over.” By the looks of it, he wasn’t kidding. With 11pm curfews and kicking partiers off beaches, it seems college students have very little to celebrate right now – but they still arrived.

Liberty Island – New York, NY

The Statue of Liberty is not only an enduring symbol of freedom for the entire world, it’s also synonymous with the country itself. Liberty Enlightening the World, the statue’s official name, still stands at the mouth of New York Harbor, as not even the COVID-19 pandemic can displace her.

Liberty Island – New York, NY

As of right now, however, Lady Liberty seems to have very little company on Liberty Island. The site having been closed off to visitors, she’ll have to wait for the pandemic to pass before people can flock to her again. Not to worry, though – she isn’t going anywhere.

The Lincoln Memorial – Washington, D.C.

Around this time in March, more than 700,000 people from around the world congregate in the nation’s capital to witness thousands of cherry trees in full bloom. In 2020, unfortunately, the National Cherry Blossom Festival has taken a sad turn, with severely limited attendance and strict enforcement of social distancing.

The Lincoln Memorial – Washington, D.C.

‘Oh, well,’ a tourist might think, ‘at least I still have the National Mall.’ While it’s true that for now the Mall and its many attractions remain open, they stand nearly deserted. This photo was taken facing the front of the Lincoln Memorial. Apart from one brave jogger, it seems a shadowy Honest Abe is the only one there…

The French Quarter – New Orleans, LA

Few places in the United States immediately translate to “nonstop party” quite like the French Quarter in New Orleans does. With its infamous Bourbon Street, the place is rocking and rolling even when Mardi Gras isn’t on.

The French Quarter – New Orleans, LA

Now, with a mandatory “stay home” order issued by the city’s mayor, and a state of emergency declared by Louisiana’s governor, not much revelry is afoot. Even tourists aren’t exempted. Police in the city have been filmed telling crowds in the Quarter to return to their hotels. So much for “Laissez les bons temps rouler,” eh?

Disneyland – Anaheim, CA

If the Happiest Place on Earth being closed isn’t a sign of the times we live in right now, we don’t know what is… It isn’t just the original Disneyland theme park in Anaheim, California, that closed down, however. All of Disney’s 12 parks around the world have, resulting in an estimated admission revenue loss of $500 million for the media giant.

Disneyland – Anaheim, CA

In 2018, they were visited by 157.3 million people. One of those people was Jeff Reitz, an Air Force veteran who had a 2,995-day streak of visiting the park. Beginning in 2011, he visited the park every single day… until the doors were padlocked in March, 2020.

New Rochelle High School – New Rochelle, NY


This stately-looking building, with its football and soccer courts, is New Rochelle High School in New Rochelle, New York. New Rochelle is a small town of only about 77,000 people – certainly nothing compared to New York City’s 8.4 million residents. So why mention it here? Because the city has become perhaps the country’s largest flash-point for COVID-19 outbreaks.

New Rochelle High School – New Rochelle, NY

With the first confirmed case coming in New Rochelle, many more followed, prompting local government to create a containment zone – a circle with a one-mile radius around the epicenter for the outbreak in the state of New York. Now, New Rochelle is virtually a ghost town.

The Bean – Chicago, IL

Illinois has been hard hit by the COVID-19 outbreak, with at least 750 documented cases, most of them in and around the Chicago area. Sadly, at least six people in the state have lost their lives. Chicago’s spirit is unconquerable, however, and is sure to persevere, as residents sang Livin’ on a Prayer by Bon Jovi at the top of their lungs one chilly Saturday night while the stay-at-home order was in effect.

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In the meantime, however, sights like the one in this photo have become all too common. That’s Chicago’s iconic Bean sculpture, or Cloud Gate by its official name, which has now been closed to visitors.

Highway at rush hour – Los Angeles, CA

If this photo reminds you of a scene from some kind of zombie apocalypse like the one depicted in “The Walking Dead,” do not adjust your sets – this is real life. If there’s one part of Los Angeles life that every Angeleno absolutely detests, it’s the traffic. Well, as the old saying goes, “be careful what you wish for” – it seems that the outbreak has put a stop to that problem.

Highway at rush hour – Los Angeles, CA

The city’s mayor called it an “absolutely critical moment” in Los Angeles history, as bars, nightclubs, movie theaters, and other establishments were ordered closed, and restaurants switched to offering only takeout and delivery.

The Golden Gate Bridge – San Francisco, CA

Motorists driving towards the Golden Gate Bridge, one of the most famous and most photographed bridges in the world, were welcomed with a digital sign reminding them to “disinfect to protect” and wash their hands.

The Golden Gate Bridge – San Francisco, CA

Traffic on the bridge, which connects San Francisco with Marin County, has never been thinner. In fact, local authorities observed 70% less traffic compared to the same time in 2019. On top of that, the Golden Gate Bridge Welcome Center, an information center and gift store, has temporarily closed.

The Sahara Hotel – Las Vegas, NV

According to Silvio Dante on an episode of The Sopranos, the two types of business that have traditionally been recession-proof since the beginning of time are “Certain aspects of show business and our thing.” Well, Las Vegas’ hotels and casinos may just be unique in the entire United States because they combine both.

The Sahara Hotel – Las Vegas, NV

So while hotels, like the Sahara Las Vegas seen here, might be recession-proof, they have proven to not be pandemic-proof. As a result, the Sahara was forced to close down three of its restaurants and at least temporarily lay off some of its staff.

A lone cable car – San Francisco, CA

San Francisco’s cable car system has been a fixture of the city since 1878, shuttling visitors and locals alike with the familiar bell-clanging.

A lone cable car – San Francisco, CA

Starting in March, 2020, however, all three lines were shut down to protect the cable cars’ operators, who aren’t separated from their passengers by a partition of some kind. They aren’t alone. The San Francisco Bay Area has taken some of the country’s strictest steps in ordering people to stay home, including those working for the tech giants of Silicone Valley.

The TCL Chinese Theatre – Hollywood, CA

This poignant photo tells more than one story. The first, and obvious one, is how deserted Hollywood Boulevard looks outside of the legendary TCL Chinese Theatre. With a statewide stay-at-home order in place for all 40 million residents of America’s most populous state, very few Hollywood vampires can be spotted trawling the boulevard.

The TCL Chinese Theatre – Hollywood, CA

The other, and less obvious, story is that of the foot- and shoe-prints closest to us. Sunk in the cement in 1998, they were left there by actor Tom Hanks. The Forrest Gump star, as well as his wife Rita Wilson, revealed they had tested positive for the virus and are in self-isolation in Australia.

A taping of The View – New York, NY

“The show must go on,” the old showbiz saying goes. In the times of COVID-19, that has often proven to be easier said than done. Many of the late night talk shows taping in New York City filmed an episode or two without an audience, before having to shut down production altogether.

A taping of The View – New York, NY

Shows like The view, seen here, are still operating, but with no one to witness it live. Meanwhile, even premieres for finished films have been pushed back, with Marvel’s new Black Widow movie starring Scarlett Johansson getting temporarily shelved, along with the new James Bond movie.

National Guardsmen outside a testing tent – New Rochelle, NY

In this photo, which seems to be lifted straight out of some kind of zombie apocalypse movie, members of the National Guard can be seen stationed in New Rochelle, New York, to assist and make sure that the one-mile containment zone the city is now under is observed.

National Guardsmen outside a testing tent – New Rochelle, NY

They’re standing near a mobile COVID-19 testing lab – hidden in those large white tents – the first to be rolled out in the state in the hopes of curtailing the spread of the virus. In the meantime, National Guardsmen also assist in handing out food and sanitizing public areas.

Moored cruise ships at PortMiami – Miami, FL

The largest ship in this photo – the MSC Meraviglia seen on the right-hand side – has been moored indefinitely in PortMiami, which is the cool-sounding name given to the port of the Sunshine State’s largest metropolitan area. What’s decidedly less cool, unfortunately, is that Miami’s (and Florida’s) significant population of retirees is at a major risk of contracting COVID-19.

Moored cruise ships at PortMiami – Miami, FL

And so, in the world’s busiest cruise ship port, all of the world’s major cruise lines have suspended their operations, leaving their ships drifting aimlessly in the water – expressing a silent hope for a better tomorrow.

Characters loitering in Times Square – New York, NY

Though at times they can be somewhat pushy, New York City’s Times Square just wouldn’t be the same without the folks inhabiting costumed characters such as Elmo or the Hulk. They’re always ready to snap a photo with an unsuspecting, wide-eyed tourist – for a fee, of course.

Characters loitering in Times Square – New York, NY

In the days of a global pandemic, their services are sadly not in great demand, as this photo proves. Taken at the very heart of Times Square, the photo also shows something else – people are just not going to the Big Apple right now.

Faneuil Hall Marketplace – Boston, MA

In happier times, Boston’s historic Faneuil Hall Marketplace is filled with people and noisy stall owners, each plying their wares to the many potential clients that line its halls. But these are not happy times, and Faneuil Hall Marketplace stands nearly abandoned even during a weekend.

Faneuil Hall Marketplace – Boston, MA

It isn’t just this Bostonian hallmark, though – most of downtown Boston is a ghost town, with many stores closing their doors since no one’s like to patronize them anyway. With social gatherings limited to 25 people tops, street performers are also gone, leaving only a sad, abandoned testament to these dangerous times.

The courtyard outside the Tropicana – Las Vegas, NV

The MGM Grand hotel and casino, seen across the way in this photo, announced it would close down temporarily as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. The Tropicana Hotel, whose courtyard we can see in this photo, vowed to stay open.

The courtyard outside the Tropicana – Las Vegas, NV

Reality, however, had other plans, as Nevada’s governor announced that all nonessential businesses in the state would close, and that includes Sin City’s gaming and hospitality hot spots. If this photo is any indication, that may have been just a formality, as people avoided the usually-busy city and its hotels in droves.

Miami Beach – Miami, FL

Landscape photographers are sure to appreciate this photo of Miami Beach, taken just recently with the entire city of Miami serving as backdrop. Anyone with even a passing familiarity with the local customs, however, would immediately notice something’s off about it.

Miami Beach – Miami, FL

We’re referring, of course, to the fact it’s completely deserted. During what’s supposed to be the high season for tourism, both Miami and Fort Lauderdale closed numerous stretches of their beaches and ordered restaurants and bars to operate at 50% capacity, AND close early.

Near the Space Needle – Seattle, WA

The original epicenter for COVID-19 in the United States was Washington state, and so the Seattle area also became the first metropolitan area to institute strict measures such as school closures and quarantines. Disrupting life in the Evergreen State has not been an easy decision to make.

Near the Space Needle – Seattle, WA

Home to enormous corporations, a “business as usual” approach would have meant a little more money in the city’s chest. How fitting, then, that the Space Needle observation tower, which is an enduring symbol of Seattle, has completely shut down in the wake of the pandemic.

A deserted Madison Square Garden – New York, NY

Dubbed the “World’s Most Famous Arena,” Madison Square Garden has been a New York City landmark since the original Garden opened its gates in 1879. Home of the NBA’s New York Knicks and the NHL’s New York Rangers, both leagues have suspended their operations.

A deserted Madison Square Garden – New York, NY

The Garden also hosts many concerts and other special events, however, such as the men’s Big East Conference tournament slated to take place in March, and the arena was well on its way to being ready for it, as seen here. The tournament was canceled due to COVID-19 concerns, however, and the entire March Madness tournament followed soon after.

The Gwinnett Invitational – Duluth, GA

With the close of all of the United States’ currently active major men’s professional sports leagues, it might seem like sporting events in general have been postponed or outright canceled. While that’s true in many, many cases, it isn’t in all of them.

The Gwinnett Invitational – Duluth, GA

Some, in fact, have vowed to carry on despite the pandemic. And so, in mid-March Duluth, Georgia, hosted the PBR Unleash The Beast Gwinnett Invitational bull-riding tournament. Thirty-five of the world’s best bull riders competed for more than $100,000 in prize money… but they did so without a single spectator in the stands.

Farragut West station – Washington, D.C.

This photo, of a train car idling at Washington, D.C.’s Farragut West station, wasn’t taken in the middle of the night, when the Metro isn’t operating. In fact, it was snapped during Friday rush hour in mid-March. Sometimes, it’s a little hard not to imagine that we’re living in the end times…

Farragut West station – Washington, D.C.

The Metro wasn’t the only thing in the D.C. area affected by the outbreak, obviously. The National Zoo, the Smithsonian Institution, and Arlington National Cemetery have all announced that they would be closing for visitors, just as the first confirmed case of COVID-19 was announced among the State Department.’s personnel.

Washington Street – San Francisco, CA

It almost seems like Bullitt himself, Steve McQueen, is about to come flying any second now in his green Ford Mustang, doesn’t it? While we’ve obviously lost the movie star forty years ago, it seems like we’ve lost all other traffic in San Francisco as well.

Washington Street – San Francisco, CA

With the victim toll slowly but steadily climbing, people are just not leaving their homes anymore. That might go a long way towards explaining why all of the cars seen in this photo of the city’s Washington Street… are parked.

Empty street in Manhattan – New York, NY

At any other time, we would find this photo of a deserted stretch of New York City road to be enchanting. With its crisscrossing pedestrian crossings and car lanes, it’s quintessentially New York. Right now, though? It’s quintessentially emblematic of life during COVID-19.

Empty street in Manhattan – New York, NY

A state of emergency has been declared in the city, which is the financial and cultural capital of the United States, leading Broadway theaters to turn off the lights as 1.1 million students were sent home with schools closing as well. Nevertheless, the number of infections in Gotham continues to rise.

The Promenade Shops at Saucon Valley – Lehigh Valley, PA

We wanted to bring you photos of life with the COVID-19 outbreak from many places in the United States, not just the big population centers of New York and Los Angeles.

The Promenade Shops at Saucon Valley – Lehigh Valley, PA

So here, we can see an overhead view of the Promenade Shops at Saucon Valley shopping mall, located in Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania. As you can see, there’s no shortage of parking spaces… It’s a sign of the statewide shutdown, as part of which only “life-sustaining” businesses were allowed to stay open during the outbreak.

The Fremont Street Experience – Las Vegas, NV

The 12.5 million LED bulbs that power the Fremont Street Experience’s 1,375-foot-long canopy may have been shut off, as the city of Las Vegas went into virtual lockdown in the wake of the COVID-19 outbreak.

The Fremont Street Experience – Las Vegas, NV

While it’s usually the venue of the city’s annual New Year’s Eve bash, there doesn’t seem to be much cause for celebration in Vegas now. However, local officials are certain that this, too, shall pass. And when it does, one of them said, Vegas will play host to the party to end all parties.

A Costco store – Novato, CA

Just because people live in California, doesn’t mean they reside in the McMansions that litter the Hollywood Hills, or the chic Painted Ladies of San Francisco.

A Costco store – Novato, CA

This shot, taken by a drone from way up high, shows shoppers outside a Costco in Novato, a city of about 51,000 people in Marin County. In 2018, Novato was ranked in the top-100 best cities to live in, in the entire U.S. Now, in 2020, times are a bit tougher. Now, just the line to enter Costco, numbers in the hundreds.

Grand Central Market – Los Angeles, CA

Grand Central Market is actually the oldest farmers’ market in Los Angeles, having first opened its doors in 1917. Now, it seems a pale shadow of its former self.

Grand Central Market – Los Angeles, CA

Sure, some vendors have remained open during the COVID-19 outbreak, but many of them fear they won’t even make enough money to pay rent, let alone turn a profit. “It’s scary, sad, and ugly,” one brave patron of the Grand Central Market remarked recently. The City of Angels could use some divine intervention right about now, it seems…

A nearly deserted road – Boston, MA

Usually, movie productions would pay thousands upon thousands of dollars for the right to film in a major American city’s street looking like this. Under COVID-19, though, it’s the new normal.

A nearly deserted road – Boston, MA

This is a stretch of road in Boston, unremarkable from any other as life in the city has seemingly slowed down to a crawl. If there’s one thing Boston is known for, it’s the city’s ability to bounce back. It has done it before, in the wake of more man-made tragedies, and it will no doubt do so again.

The Missouri Senate chamber – Jefferson City, MO

When life in the United States grinds down to a halt, it really grinds down to a halt. Local senators in Jefferson City, Missouri, for example adjourned in mid-March, 2020, and announced they would not reconvene until at least the end of the month over COVID-19 concerns.

The Missouri Senate chamber – Jefferson City, MO

It was all the senators could do to rush through various spending bills, in fact, just so local government could keep on trucking in their absence. Local legislative bodies in Illinois and Delaware, to name just two suspended states, have made similar announcements.

Times Square locals – Midtown Manhattan, NY

On any given day, Times Square is the home of some 380,000 people. Some of these people are tourists, but others are the locals who gather and congregate and hang out.

Times Square locals – Midtown Manhattan, NY

While this bustling city center is typically teeming with people, you can see from this photograph, not even the locals are gathering together to play chess or swap stories. It may look scary, but it’s also smart, especially since social distancing is key to helping to flatten the curve.

Broadway Theater District – Midtown Manhattan, NY

The Broadway district of New York City is the home to some 41 professional theaters, all of which typically show a wide assortment of plays for the masses to consume and enjoy.

Broadway Theater District – Midtown Manhattan, NY

Tickets for these shows are normally in high demand, but the quarantine has instead turned off the lights on the stages. Instead, people are choosing to stay home and are watching the news on their television sets instead of trying to catch a show in the theater.

Grand Central Station – Midtown Manhattan, NY

Grand Central Station isn’t just a major part of many New Yorker’s commutes. It’s also one of the most famous commuter rail stations in the world.

Grand Central Station – Midtown Manhattan, NY

Normally, Grand Central Station sees upwards of 750,000 thousand passengers per day, but this unnerving picture clearly shows that not even a fraction of those numbers are turning out anymore. With so many businesses being forced to shut down due to the quarantine, and the majority of staff on furlough, people no longer need to commute to their workplaces.

Hollywood Walk of Fame – Los Angeles, CA

The world-famous Hollywood Walk of Fame is home to over 2,600 five-pointed brass stars that are carefully installed and embedded into the sidewalk. Each star represents someone that the media has deemed noteworthy enough to warrant such a star throughout their celebrity career.

Hollywood Walk of Fame – Los Angeles, CA

And while some stars have drawn more attention and even controversy than others, nobody is coming out to stroll along this 15-block stretch of sidewalk due to the uncertainty surrounding the coronavirus. Instead, they’re staying home and watching their preferred celebrities on TV.

Walt Disney Concert Hall – Los Angeles, CA

The Los Angeles Music Center is one of the world’s largest and most popular hotspots for the performing arts. Normally it sees a whopping 1.3 million music fans and visitors each year, but that number has now dwindled to a screeching halt.

Walt Disney Concert Hall – Los Angeles, CA

The Walt Disney Concert Hall, which is part of this prolific music center, shut its doors to guests on March 12. Now, instead of regaling and entertaining the masses, no music graces this building. Instead, it’s a quiet and somber reminder of the current situation.

Congress Street – Boston, MA

To the city of Boston, the annual St. Patrick’s Day celebration and parade is a huge and largely ubiquitous part of this city’s culture and heritage.

Congress Street – Boston, MA

Normally, the parade would draw in over 300,000 guests from around the world, with over 25,000 people choosing to march and participate in the parade. However, the city decided to cancel this event in light of the coronavirus fears, and instead of being packed with revelers? This city is now a spooky ghost town.

The T – Boston, MA

The Massachusetts Bay Transit Authority (MBTA), also affectionately known as The T to Boston natives — usually sees around 1.3 million people every single day.

The T – Boston, MA

However, with the fears surrounding the coronavirus, people are not risking taking public transportation at this time. Instead, they’re choosing to stay home, which can help slow the spread of the virus. This unsettling picture shows how empty The T is these days, which is in stark contrast to its usual volume of passengers.

Quincy Market – Boston, MA

The Faneuil Hall Marketplace is a historic shopping center in Boston. It’s usually thriving with visitors who go to the market for yummy food from its numerous restaurants and then stop to listen to the street performers showing off their artistic talents.

Quincy Market – Boston, MA

The Quincy Market, which is part of the Faneuil Hall Marketplace, is also normally thriving and sees over 40,000 each day. However, these days? As you can see, they’re no longer turning up in droves to this iconic location.

The Capitol Building – Washington, D.C.

Normally the United States Capitol Building, located in the heart of the nation in Washington, D.C., sees upwards of three million guests each year. That averages out to about 8,000 people each and every day.

The Capitol Building – Washington, D.C.

While you might think that curious vacationers and tourists might not set aside their plans to visit the nation’s capital, the coronavirus has people rescheduling their trips and cancelling their plans. This empty street shows what the Capitol Building looks like today, with fears of the coronavirus keeping people at home.

South Beach – Miami, FL

Normally Miami is absolutely packed with visitors this time of the year, with Spring Breakers and young people flocking to these sandy beaches for a little bit of sunshine and celebration.

South Beach – Miami, FL

These beach chairs are normally full, with people actually competing with one another to get one of these highly coveted seats. Today, though, you could get your pick of chairs. The beaches are empty and quiet, and the revelers are avoiding the beaches — and getting a head start on their summer tan — these days.

Abandoned tennis courts – Los Angeles, CA

For many people, fitness isn’t just a hobby. It’s also a way of life. If you try to tell a tennis buff that they’re going to have to put their match on hold, they might look at you with a strange look.

Abandoned tennis courts – Los Angeles, CA

After all, exercising is extremely important to millions of Americans and allows them to stay fit and happy during stressful times. However, this empty tennis court in Los Angeles shows that even the most serious tennis aficionados are taking this quarantine very seriously.

No bargain hunters – Los Angeles, CA

Shopping is normally a way for people to treat themselves during times of stress. After all, retail therapy is usually something that gives a temporary pick-me-up and allows them to blow off some steam.

No bargain hunters – Los Angeles, CA

This photograph of an empty mall in Los Angeles, though, shows that people aren’t willing to risk exposure to the coronavirus just to pick up a new outfit. Popular retailers have been taking their business online, instead, in order to help keep their sales up.

Taking social distancing seriously – San Francisco, CA

While many people are choosing to stay home and ride out the coronavirus from the safety of their homes, other people are fighting boredom by choosing to leave their house…albeit carefully.

Taking social distancing seriously – San Francisco, CA

This picture shows two people who slipped out of their homes to get in a little bit of a walk and some coffee, but the large gap between them reveals that they’re taking their social distancing seriously. They’re still willing to chat with one another, just from a safe distance.

The BART – San Franciso, CA

Even though the entire city of San Francisco is on lockdown and has a shelter-in-place order in effect, not everyone can stay home. Because they work in essential industries — such as grocery stores or in infrastructure — they still need to take public transit to get to and from their jobs.

The BART – San Franciso, CA

The Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) is San Francisco’s largest light rail commuter system and sees an average of 170,000 people each day. This hardworking man isn’t taking any risks on his ride to work.

Smith Cove Cruise Terminal – Seattle, WA

The cruise industry has all been shut down since coronavirus has swept the nation. The Smith Cove Cruise Terminal at Pier 91 typically is a bustling hub for many of the major cruise lines, but with many people taking precautions and cancelling their vacation plans, this port lays quiet and dormant.

Smith Cove Cruise Terminal – Seattle, WA

Normally over 213 cruise ships dock here, shuttling around 1.2 million cruise goers each year, but now not a single soul dares take a stroll along the waterside.

Washington State Convention Center – Seattle, WA

Normally springtime means that convention season is in full spring in Seattle, Washington. It’s normally not unheard of for around 410,000 guests to flock to the Washington State Convention Center in order to share their unique hobbies and interests, but not today.

Washington State Convention Center – Seattle, WA

All conventions — ranging from pop-culture and anime cons to tech and education conventions — have ground to a screeching halt and have been put on hold for the time being. The only person roaming this empty building is a lone security guard on his routine patrols.

The New York Stock Exchange – Lower Manhattan, NY

It’d be a vast understatement to say that the current stock market is volatile right now. Wild swings, from massive drops to sudden dips, have affected the stock market these days.

The New York Stock Exchange – Lower Manhattan, NY

While the New York Stock Exchange is usually a thriving hub of activity in New York’s Financial District, as it is the world’s largest stock exchange and sees around $30.1 trillion dollars exchange hands each year, people are instead choosing to place their bets from the safety of their own homes.

School’s out of session – Freeport, NY

While education is usually held to the highest of priorities in the United States, the risk of children getting sick — and accidentally carrying the coronavirus home to infect their families — has caused schools across the country to shut down.

School’s out of session – Freeport, NY

Many institutions have implemented remote classes, allowing pupils to learn from their homes. Other schools, though, have no such policy in place. This picture of Caroline G. Atkinson school in Freeport, New York, shows row after row of empty school buses.

No parking guests – Manhattan, NY

Normally the entire downtown region of New York is thriving with people. Not only does it see scores of tourists and visitors, millions of people make the commute to the city to perform their work responsibilities, too.

No parking guests – Manhattan, NY

Parking spaces are something that people normally fight over, and trying to secure a good spot can be a challenge. Now, though, you can get your pick of parking spots. The normally packed parking lots are completely barren, as this picture (which also shows the shadow of an empty high-rise building) reveals.

The Port of Oakland – Oakland, CA

It’s not just cruise ports that have ground to a screeching halt in the light of this coronavirus pandemic. The Port of Oakland, which normally serves one of the busiest container ports in the entire United States (the fifth busiest, to be specific), has noticed a dramatic reduction in activity as of late.

The Port of Oakland – Oakland, CA

Usually this port is responsible for overseeing the majority of imports and exports in the state, and it normally welcomes over 11 million visitors each year. Now, though? It lays quiet and still as it waits for the coronavirus to subside.

Oracle Park – San Francisco, CA

Baseball is America’s favorite pastime, and for good reason. It’s an iconic and quintessential symbol of what America represents and is part of its traditions, just like apple pie.

Oracle Park – San Francisco, CA

Normally Oracle Park, located in the South Beach region of San Francisco, has a capacity of 41,915 visitors and gives over 300 tours each year. Baseball season is normally in full swing around the end of March, but today this home of the San Francisco Giants is empty and quiet. Who knows when the sports like baseball will actually resume?

EvergreenHealth Medical Center – Kirkland, WA

Depending on who you ask, many people believe that Washington State is the ground zero for the coronavirus pandemic. The residents of this state are taking this threat extremely seriously, as this blue tent set up outside the EvergreenHealth Medical Center in Kirkland demonstrates.

EvergreenHealth Medical Center – Kirkland, WA

As hospitals continue to fill up with people who have coronavirus (or suspect that they may have it), additional testing centers are necessary to help identify people who might be sick. Fortunately, EvergreenHealth has been ranked as one of the top 100 hospitals in the nation.

A careful bicyclist – Auburn, WA

Staying active is vital for both your physical and mental wellbeing during these trying times. While going out in large groups is frowned upon, many cities are encouraging their citizens to continue to engage in physical activity…just as long as they take necessary precautions and avoid exposing others to the coronavirus.

A careful bicyclist – Auburn, WA

This athlete is enjoying a long and leisurely bike ride along a path in Auburn, Washington. They’re being careful to protect themselves — and their neighbors — by staying solo and wearing a face mask during their ride.

The Magic Kingdom – Orlando, FL

While most people are taking the coronavirus quarantine very seriously and making sure they do their part to avoid exposing themselves and others to this nasty virus, some people aren’t taking the right approach to it and consider it an extended vacation.

The Magic Kingdom – Orlando, FL

That’s why all of the major theme parks in the country have voluntarily shut down. Their proactive measures will go a long way in helping to prevent the spread of coronavirus, and this picture of the Magic Kingdom in Orlando, Florida, shows that even the mouse is laying low right now.

Pier 39 – San Francisco, CA

When most people think of San Francisco, CA, they think of the iconic Golden Gate Bridge or Alcatraz. The most popular tourist attraction in this entire city, though, is actually Pier 39.

Pier 39 – San Francisco, CA

Over 15.2 million people come to this pier each year to enjoy fine dining, shopping and to admire the sea lions that congregate here. Normally this pier is thriving with activity, but these days, very few people are feeling brave enough to venture out to it. This picture shows just one lone visitor walking past an empty carousel.

Josie Robertson Plaza – Manhattan, NY

When someone plans a trip to New York City, the Lincoln Center is usually high up there on things that they must see. This active city center is normally host to over 5 million visitors each and every year, as people love to gather to enjoy a program at the New York Philharmonic, the Metropolitan Opera, and the New York City Ballet.

Josie Robertson Plaza – Manhattan, NY

While a show at the Josie Robertson Plaza is usually considered a must-see and a treat for all tourists, this picture shows that most people are setting the arts to the wayside these days.

The United Nations Headquarters – New York City, NY

Ever since it opened its doors to the public in 1952, the United Nations Headquarters has greeted millions of visitors. While the Visitor Centre usually offers guided tours in the six official languages of the United Nations, these days, they have been temporarily stopped.

The United Nations Headquarters – New York City, NY

Even without a guided tour, many people would flock to it to admire its unique architecture. This stunning picture depicts how quiet the Visitor Centre is these days, serving as a somber reminder of how serious this coronavirus pandemic really is.

Los Angeles Airport – Los Angeles, CA

Normally spring is one of the busier times for travel, as many people are taking advantage of spring break and the holiday season to spend time with their families. Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) is the second largest international airport in the United States (second only to Hartfield-Jackson in Atlanta).

Los Angeles Airport – Los Angeles, CA

Usually this airport greets over 63 million passengers each year, helping them to travel across both the nation and the world. These days, though, the airport is curiously subdued and flights are being cancelled across the board.

The Holland Tunnel – Jersey City, NJ

Built in 1927, the Holland Tunnel dips an astounding 93 feet below sea level as it connects passengers from Manhattan to Jersey City.

The Holland Tunnel – Jersey City, NJ

This tunnel is usually packed during rush hour, seeing around 100,000 passengers each day, making it an absolute nightmare for both commuters and claustrophobes. This picture, though, was taken just after 5 o’clock in the afternoon, when it would normally be showing bumper to bumper traffic. Seeing how smoothly the flow of traffic moved must have been extremely shocking to locals.

Food cart vendor – Midtown Manhattan, NY

When you go to New York City, there are a few things that you expect to see during your visit to this active city. You probably wouldn’t be surprised, for instance, to see street performers and brightly colored billboards.

Food cart vendor – Midtown Manhattan, NY

Another trademark icon of this city is its food court vendors, which make it a breeze to pick up a quick bite to eat between tourist attractions. While these vendors are usually doing good business, this food cart vendor is dragging his empty cart alongside himself as he strolls the empty streets near Times Square.

Completely empty parkway – Yonkers, NY

As one of the more populous cities in New York, this parkway in Yonkers usually serves as one of the major arteries that connect people between the major cities. Normally, traffic is a challenge to maneuver.

Completely empty parkway – Yonkers, NY

During rush hour, people can easily find themselves nose-to-bumper for long periods of time. This picture shows that traffic is lighter than usual in this normally bustling metropolitan area. While this may seem like a spooky sight, it’s actually a good thing; it means that people are obeying orders to stay home.

Early morning traffic – Downtown Atlanta, GA

Atlanta, Georgia is one of the nation’s busiest cities, and nearly a half-million people call this fast-paced metropolis their home. On average, commuters who are going to and from Atlanta spend around two hours in traffic just to get to their workplace.

Early morning traffic – Downtown Atlanta, GA

While being stuck in a complete traffic jam is typically the norm for the 37th most populous city in the United States, this picture shows that the early morning traffic is moving along smoothly now that most people are being advised to stay home.

Union Station – Washington, D.C.

Located just blocks away from the United States Capitol, Union Station isn’t just one of the more busier commuter stations in the country. It’s also normally an extremely active shopping and dining center, too.

Union Station – Washington, D.C.

Around 5 million people travel through Union Station each year, and this hub actually serves as the headquarters for Amtrak and is the 9th busiest in the entire country. These days, though, you would be hard pressed to spot any other travelers, as most people are avoiding travel in favor of staying home.

The Grand Ole Opry – Nashville, TN

Nothing defines country music quite like The Grand Ole Opry in Nashville, Tennessee. This historic music hall can normally hold up to 4,400 visitors and has been entertaining guests since it opened its doors to the public in 1925.

The Grand Ole Opry – Nashville, TN

However, with the risk of coronavirus being so high, The Opry has instead decided to close its doors to visitors. That isn’t to say that it’s not still putting on shows, though. This picture shows a musician putting on a show for fans who are tuning in at home.

The Luxor – Las Vegas, Nevada

Las Vegas is normally extremely active all year round, with visitors flocking to it to enjoy shows, playing the tables, and walking up and down the famous Las Vegas Strip.

The Luxor – Las Vegas, Nevada

While the Luxor usually is host to some of the city’s 39 million annual visitors, this hotel has suddenly found itself empty as people are cancelling their trips and asking for refunds for their hotel rooms. The hotel has recently admitted that it’s started releasing its employees, as the economy in this city has been severely damaged by the coronavirus pandemic.

The Ronald Reagan Freeway – Simi Valley, CA

California State Route 118 — also known as the Ronald Reagan Freeway by locals — normally is the main freeway that connects commuters from east to west between Ventura and Los Angeles Counties.

The Ronald Reagan Freeway – Simi Valley, CA

Because this road is so integral to local travel, it’s usually absolutely packed throughout the day. This picture is a jarring reminder that the coronavirus has made even rush hour traffic unpredictable, and travellers are able to get from Point A to Point B much easier now that most people are staying home.

Remote worship services – Springfield, IL

In trying times like these, many people turn to their faith to help give them peace and answer their questions. Unfortunately, going to one’s place of worship during a pandemic is a risk that most service leaders are not willing to take.

Remote worship services – Springfield, IL

This picture shows a pastor at the First United Methodist Church in Springfield, Illinois. He’s delivering his sermon to his congregation, but the pews are empty. Most churches, temples, synagogues, and mosques are remaining closed during the mandatory quarantine.

Pentagon City Mall – Arlington, VA

The Fashion City Mall, also known as the Pentagon City Mall, is one of the more popular malls in the area. It boasts 164 different shops and stores for choosy shoppers, but these days, people are choosing to do their buying online.

Pentagon City Mall – Arlington, VA

Because of the fears of contracting the coronavirus, the average person has been avoiding doing any retail shopping in brick and mortar shops. This shopping center is now just a shell of its former self, as this picture clearly depicts.

The Diag – Ann Arbor, MI

When most people think of Michigan, they typically think of the automotive manufacturing of Detroit. However, the state takes its arts very seriously, which is why the Diag is normally packed to the brim with people.

The Diag – Ann Arbor, MI

The Diag is located in the heart of the Central Campus of the University of Michigan, and usually you’d be able to see both students and tourists milling about in this area. With the college campus now empty of its students and visitors to the city choosing to avoid public areas, the Diag now is eerily silent during the coronavirus lockdown.